I Meant To Do That

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It’s show #478 For July 22nd, 2020, and today we are talking about joinery mistakes.

Sponsored by You

If you want to help support the show, you can do so by going to Patreon.com/woodtalk and signing up to become a patron of the show. Thank you Patrons.

Sponsored by Rockler

Having the right tools for the job is important if you want to avoid joinery mistakes. Rockler has everything you need including router bits, joinery jigs, t-track and accessories to make your own jigs, and more. Find these tools at Rockler.com.

Rockler also has over 100 Skill Builder videos where you can learn different woodworking techniques including how to make waterfall corner joints, cutting notches for lap joints with a circular saw, how to make cabinet doors with rail and stile router bits and more. These videos can be found at Rockler.com/how-to or on Rockler’s YouTube channel.

If you do have a question about joinery or want to talk through how to fix a mistake, you can always ask a retail associate or contact Rockler’s product support team at support@rockler.com or 1-800-260-9663.

Kickback

Sean and Trevor both have suggestions for a cheap alternative to Marc’s fancy bench matt. A yoga matt or this silicon crafter’s matt.

Joinery Mistakes

We all make joinery mistakes and the guys talk about their most boneheaded joinery mistakes and how they fixed them. Plus they talk about some pretty common joinery issues like:

  • Tenon too small or too large
  • Gappy joints
  • Inconsistent dado/groove depth
  • Sliding dovetail too tight

Ask Us a Question

Send in questions via the contact form here on site or hit us up on IG at woodtalkshow or send us a voicemail using your phone voice memo app to woodtalkshow@gmail.com

Finally you can find us individually on Instagram at mattcremona, woodwhisperer, and renaissancewoodworker

Social Media Homework

Send us a picture of your best joinery fix. Use the hashtag: #woodtalk478.

One reply on “I Meant To Do That”

One thing i’ve done to counter ill fiting miters or tenon shoulders is to back bevel them. Paring a tenon shoulder down towards the tenon or shaving the back side of a miter a degree or two helps the faces to make contact

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